The Eucharistic Twinkie

Snack-Cake Spirituality from The Merry Mystic

There’s no way to sugar-coat it: in this video, I read a poem and take a bite out of a Twinkie.  (You might notice a bit of a bow to Julian of Norwich at the end of the poem: hazelnut to her, Twinkie to me.)

I think this was the first Twinkie I’ve tasted since I had a deep-fried specimen at the Bureau County Fair in Illinois, years ago.   But what do you think: can a Twinkie be full of the Spirit of God?  Is there even room in there, amid the sodium stearoyl lactylate and xanthan gum?

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8 thoughts on “The Eucharistic Twinkie

  1. What a wonderful reflection. There is a song I love from the Seasons of the Spirit curriculum, Here In This Ordinary Place, that celebrates the sacramentality of life.

    • Hi Chuck,

      Thanks! Is that Bret Hesla’s song? I didn’t know it was part of the Seasons of the Spirit, but if that’s the one I’m thinking of, folks can listen to it on Bret’s site here.

  2. I wasn’t sure you were going to have the courage to bite into that Twinkie! I remember when the local grocery store was giving away a Twinkie to every customer, and every customer was politely declining . . . Thanks, Adam. Your weekly videos are a balm to my spirit . . .

    • Thanks, Debby.

      In my previous career I was a professor of computer science. When I lectured on the history of the field, I used to give a little tongue-in-cheek example: “If Twinkies had improved as rapidly as computers since 1946, a single Twinkie would cost $0.0005, and would … make you gain 8600 pounds.” I always brought a pack of Twinkies to class as a visual aid. I offered them to the students after class, but I can’t remember that anyone ever ate one.

      • Hah! But Origen wrote, “For the destruction of the last enemy must be understood in this way, not that its substance which was made by God shall perish, but that the hostile purpose and will which proceeded, not from God but from itself, will come to an end.” If he was right, Devil Dogs (along with all us Twinkies) will be purified in the end. How this might be, I can’t imagine — but perhaps nothing is impossible for God.